• GIHR

UPR 37th SESSION : REVIEW OF OMAN

In Accordance with HRC resolution 5/1 and resolution 16/21, the Universal Periodic Review Working Group holds three two-week sessions every year. Each session 14 countries are reviewed, totaling to 42 countries per year and resulting in the review of 193 countries (entire UN membership) by the end of each UPR cycle.



To watch the full review.


On the 21st of January, the Human Rights Council ended the week with a review of the Sultanate of Oman. This constitutes the third report of Oman under the UPR on the human rights situation.


COUNTRY CONTEXT:


H.E. Mr. Abdullah Mohamed Said Al Saidi, Minister of Justice and Legal Affairs of Oman

stressed Oman's resolve to comply with its international commitments and ensuring the promotion and protection of human rights. Furthermore, he announced that on the 11th of January 2021 a new law was adopted highlighting the promotion of rights, public freedoms and support for state institutions, providing a stable process for the transfer of power and reaffirming independence for the judiciary and rule of law.



Oman was commended for

  • Accession to 3 core human rights instruments : the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), The International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance and of social rights and the Convention Against Torture.

  • The gender parity achieved in the education sector and the inclusive education for all

  • The establishment of a mechanism accessible to women who were victims to discrimination or violence.

Some recommendations made to Oman include:

  • Continue working towards ensuring freedom of expression and opinion for all.

  • Continue efforts to consolidate and coordinate best practice on the rights of children with disabilities.

  • Take immediate measures so that human rights defenders and civil society stakeholders may carry out activities without threat of harassment or violence by members of the security forces.

  • Expand the scope of the labor legislation to cover domestic workers and criminalize forced labor.